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Lesson 33

 

Aandi eteg nimazina'igan? - Where is my book?
Aandi etegin gimazina'iganan? - Where are your books?
Aandi ebid nindasemaa? - Where is my tobacco?
Aandi ebiwaad ninzigarettimag? - Where are my cigarettes?
Gigii-mikaanan na gimakizinan? - Did you find your shoes?
Gaawiin ningii-mikawaasii gizhooniyaam - I didn't find your money.
Awenen gaa-mikawaad nizhooniyaaman? - Who found my money?
Awenen gaa-odaapinang nimazina'iganan? - Who took my books?
Awenen gaa-odaapinaad nindasemaan? - Who took my tobacco?
Ningii-asaa nindasemaa adoopowining - I put my tobacco on the table.
Gigii-odaapinimaan na gibaabaa ozhooniyaaman? - Did you take your father's money?
Ningii-odaapinimaan - I took him.
Aandi gaa-asimad? - Where did you put him?
Aandi gaa-asimad gibaabaa odasemaanza'? - Where did you put your father's tobacco?
Gigii-mikawimaan na gibaabaa odoopwaaganan? - Did you find your father's pipe?
Gaawiin nindoonji-mikawimaasiin - I didn't find him.
Gigii-mikaan na gibaabaa ojiimaan? - Did you find your father's boat?
Gaawiin nindoonji-mikansiin - I didn't find it.
Ehe, ningii-mikaan - Yeah, I found it.
Ganawaabandan gininjiin - Look at your hands.
Ganawaabaam gizhganzhiig - Look at your nails.
 
 

New Words:

odasemaanza' = his tobacco, his cigarettes (plural, obviative)
opwaagan(ag) - tobacco pipe
nininj(iin) - my hand, my finger
nizhganzh(iig) - my nail
 
 

Note.

There are vti verbs and vta verbs with objects in possessive form.

  • Note that only vta verbs' objects, which are possessed by him/her are animate and thus are in obviative.

    When speaking about i, you, etc, who put, find, or did something with 'another s/he' (animate thing which is possessed by him/her), different affixes are used!

    A form
     another himanother them
    ini-(verb)-imaanni-(verb)-imaa'
    you singl.gi-(verb)-imaangi-(verb)-imaa'


    B form
     another him, them
    i(verb)-imag
    you singl.(verb)-imad

    Gigii-mikawaa na opwaagan? - Did you find a pipe (him)?
    Gigii-mikawimaan na gibaabaa odoopwaaganan? - Did you find your father's pipe (another him)?

  • There is no difference in vti suffixes for objects in possessive form and in usual form:

    Gigii-mikaan na jiimaan? - Did you find a boat?
    Gigii-mikaan na gibaabaa ojiimaan? - Did you find your father's boat?

  • Body parts in Ojibwe are also used only with possessive affixes. But despite kin terms, they could be both animate and inanimate.

  • In statements:

    Aandi gaa-asimad gibaabaa odasemaanza'? - Where did you put your father's tobacco?
    Gigii-mikaan na gibaabaa ojiimaan? - Did you find your father's boat?, etc,

    Gibaabaa means father's. It is not an object itself. Objects there are odasemaanza', ojiimaan, etc.

    In a statement:

    Awenen gaa-mikawaad nizhooniyaaman? - Who found my money?

    nizhooniyaman is obviative. A subject there - 'awenen' - 'who' is the third person - he or she (check: who does it?; s/he does it), so nizhooniyaam is an animate object, it's 'another he', so it must take an obviative suffix because of it.
     
     


    Grammar note.

    Body parts are dependent nouns in Ojibwe. They always stand in possessive form. But despite kin terms some of body part terms are animate and some - inanimate nouns.

     

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