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Lesson 27

 

Awenenan waabmaad animosh? - Who[m] does the dog see?
Awenenan waabamaad? - Who[m] does s/he see?
Maagizha animoshan owaabamaan - Maybe he sees a dog.
Awenenan noondawaad? - Who[m] does s/he hear?
Nimbaabaa onoondawaan ma'iinganan - My father hears a wolf.
Nimbaabaa onoondawaan - My father hears him.
Onoondawaan ma'iinganan - S/he hears a wolf.
Onoondawaan - S/he hears him.
Nimbaabaa onoondawaa' ma'iingana' - My father hears wolves.
Onoondawaa' - S/he hears them.
Awedi na inini ogikenimaan gibaabaayan? - Does that man know your father?
Awedi na inini ogikenimaan? - Does that man know him?
Ogikenimaan na gibaabaayan? - Does he know your father?
Miinange, ogikenimaan - Yes, he knows him.
Ogikenimaa' na gigozisa'? - Does he know your sons?
Miinange, ogikenimaa' - Yes, he knows them.
Ogikenimaan na iniwe ininiwan? - Does he know that man?
Ogikenimaan na awe inini? - Does that man know him?
Gaawiin, nimaamaa ogikenimaasiin gimaamaayan - My mother doesn't know your mother.
Gaawiin, ogikenimaasi' onowe ikwewa' - She doesn't know these women.
Gaawiin, ogikenimaasi' onowe anishinaabe' - She doesn't know these people.
Awenen gaa-mikawaad nizhooniyaman? - Who found my money?
Niin, ningii-mikawaa - I found him.
Awenenan gibaabaa gaa-mawadisaad bijiinaago? - Who[m] did your father visit yesterday.
Ogii-ando-mawadisaa' osayeya' - He went to visit his older brothers.
Awenenan ogowe animoshag genawaabamaawad? - Who[m] are those dogs looking at?
Awenenan noondawaawad? - Who[m] do they hear?
Awiyan owaabamaawaan - They see someone.
Abinojiiya' onoondawaawa' - They hear children.
Igiwe na ininiwag ogii-mikawaawa' abinojiiya'? - Did those men find the children?
Igiwe ininiwag ogii-mikawaawaan - Those men found him.
Ogii-mikawaawaan - They found him.
Ogii-mikawaawa' - They found them.
Gaawiin, ogii-mikawaasiiwan - They didn't find him.
 
 

New Words:

mawadishi /mawadis-/ - visit someone (vta)
zhooniya - money (animate)
nizhooniyaman - my money (obviative)
 
 

Notes

  • Obviative. Obviative usually helps to define a subject from an object:

    Ogikenimaan na iniwe ininiwan? - Does he (proximate) know that man (inini-wan; obviative)?
    Ogikenimaan na awe inini? - Does that man (inini; proximate) know him (obviative)?

    All obviative nouns, even in singular, take plural inanimate demonstrative pronouns:

    iniwe ininiwan - that man; obviative.

    These are vta affixes for objects in obviative:

    Independent order, neutral mode:

    obviative 3d person sg.obviative 3d person pl.
    s/he o-(verb)-an o-(verb)-a'
    they o-(verb)-awaan o-(verb)-awa'

    Independent order, negative mode:

    obviative 3d person sg.obviative 3d person pl.
    s/he o-(verb)-asiin o-(verb)-asi'
    they o-(verb)-asiiwaan o-(verb)-asiiwa'


    Conjunct order, neutral mode:

    obviative 3d person sg.obviative 3d person pl.
    s/he (verb)-ad (verb)- a'
    they (verb)-awaad (verb)-awa'
    Conjunct order, negative mode:

    obviative 3d person sg.obviative 3d person pl.
    s/he (verb)-asiig (verb)-sinog
    they (verb)-asigwaa (verb)-asigwa'

    Obviative s/he is usually an object in Ojibwe.
    The only exclusion - his/her relatives, which are always obviative, even if they are subjects.

     

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