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Lesson 17 - Where

 

Aandi eyaayan? - Where do you live?
Gidayaa na iwedi? - Do you live over there?
Omaa nindayaa - I live here.
Aandi eyaad gisaye? - Where is your older brother?
Aandi gisaye? - Where is your older brother?
Iwedi ayaa - He is over there.
Abin omaa - Sit here.
Omaa zhingishinin - Lie here.
Imaa zhingishinig - Lie there you people.
Gawishimon - Lie down.
Aandi eyaad gibaabaa? - Where is your father?
Aandi gibaabaa? - Where is your father?
Jiimaaning abi - he is sitting in the boat.
Aandi eyaawaad abinoojiiyag? - Where are the children?
Aandi abinoojiiyag? - Where are the children?
Odaabaaning ayaawag. - They are in the car.
Aandi eyaad Mary? - Where is Mary?
Aandi Mary? - Where is Mary?
Aandi eyaad? - Where is s/he?
Imaa ayaa - S/he is there.
Omaa ayaa - S/he is here.
Aandi eyaawaad gimaamaa zhigo gibaabaa? - Where are your mom and dad?
Aandi gimaamaa zhigo gibaabaa? - Where are your mom and dad?
Aandi eyaawaad? - Where are they?
Biindig ayaawag. - They are inside.
Agojiing ayaawag - They are outside.
Abin omaa desabiwining - Sit here on the chair. 
 
 

New Words:

aandi - where; where to.
ayaa - he is (in a certain place); he dwells
omaa - here
imaa - there
iwedi - over there
zhingishin - he lies.
gawishimo - he lies down.
zhigo, or zhigwa - now; at this time; then; and. 
 
 

Note.

  • Ayaa - means both 'to be in a certain place' and 'to live in a certain place'. Ayaa starts with a-, which changes into e- in content questions - eyaad (he is; he lives).

  • There is no auxiliary verb to be in Ojibwe. Is is never used in such statements as 'where is he?', 'he is there', etc. Instead Ojibwe statements look like: 'where he?', 'he there', etc. Ayaa, which is often translated into English as 'is' -
    Aandi eyaad Mary? - Where is Mary?
    In fact is an independent verb, which means 'is situated', 'is in a place', and it could be dropped if a speaker thinks that he doesn't need this particular meaning:
    Aandi Mary?
    Aandi gibaabaa zhigo gimaamaa?

  • To say 'in something', 'on something', 'to something', 'at something' in Ojibwe, one else suffix is attached to a word: -ing. This suffix is called the locative suffix. A noun with the locative suffix answers questions: where?, where to?, where from?, etc. Wherever you use a word, which is an answer to these questions, you need to add the locative suffix to it:

    jiimaan (boat) - jiimaan-ing (in a boat)
    odaabaan (car) - odaabaan-ing (in a car)
    desabiwin (chair) - desabiwin-ing (on a chair)
    adoopowin (table) - adoopowin-ing (on/in a table)

    The locative suffix is not necessarily -ing, it could also be -ong, -ang, or -ng, depending on a noun stem:

    makak (box) - makak-ong (in/on a box)
    mashkimod (bag) - mashkimod-aang (in a bag) 

  • A word zhingishin (he lies) ends in a consonant -n. To make commands, -in or -ig are added to it.
     


     

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